International working group met at Leipzig to study tropical Andean diversity

Last week, a team of researchers from different parts of the world met at the German Center for Biodiversity Research (iDIV) in Leipzig (Germany) to put forward new studies to improve our understanding of Andean tropical montane forests diversity and its origin. The team consisted of 15 researchers from eight different countries, including the USA, Ecuador, Argentina, the UK, Finland, Sweden, Germany and Spain. The team coordinators are members of the Tropical Ecology Lab. Out of this meeting, a first study was proposed to identify major biogeographical regions in the tropical Andes based on forest plots, and a second one to try understanding how and why plant species shift along altitudinal gradients in the Andes.

Throughout this year we will carry out the research, and in January 2020 there will be a second meeting to present the results.

From left to right and from top to bottom: Nadja Rüger (iDIV, Germany), Belén Fadrique (University of Miami, USA), Íñigo Granzow de la Cerda (Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain), Guillermo Bañares de Dios (Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain), Manuel J. Macía (Madrid Autonomous University, Spain), Selene Báez (Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Ecuador), Ricardo Segovia (University of Edinburgh, UK), Jürgen Homeier (University of Göttingen, Germany), William Farfán-Rios (Wake Forest University, USA), Jens Mutke (Nees-Institut für Biodiversität der Pflanzen, Germany), Hanna Tuomisto (University of Turku, Finland), Luis Cayuela (Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain), Christine Bacon (University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Jonathan Myers (Washington University in St. Louis, USA), and Sergio J. Ceballos (Instituto de Ecologia Regional, Argentina).

From left to right and from top to bottom: Nadja Rüger (iDIV, Germany), Belén Fadrique (University of Miami, USA), Íñigo Granzow de la Cerda (Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain), Guillermo Bañares de Dios (Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain), Manuel J. Macía (Madrid Autonomous University, Spain), Selene Báez (Escuela Politécnica Nacional, Ecuador), Ricardo Segovia (University of Edinburgh, UK), Jürgen Homeier (University of Göttingen, Germany), William Farfán-Rios (Wake Forest University, USA), Jens Mutke (Nees-Institut für Biodiversität der Pflanzen, Germany), Hanna Tuomisto (University of Turku, Finland), Luis Cayuela (Rey Juan Carlos University, Spain), Christine Bacon (University of Gothenburg, Sweden), Jonathan Myers (Washington University in St. Louis, USA), and Sergio J. Ceballos (Instituto de Ecologia Regional, Argentina).

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